Visions in Conflict - Visions in conflict Vol. I
Visions in Conflict -
Vision in conflict Volume I
 
 
Visions in Conflict: International Perspectives on
Values and Enmity
 
 
With contributions from members of the American Psychological Association, Psychological Society of South Africa, and others
this 2010 book may be of interest to teachers and students of
religion, theology, psychology, counseling, social work,
anthropology, political science, military science, and conflict
resolution, among others.
 
This volume contains presentations from recent symposia and
essays written by other experts from around the world on
powerful vehicles of conflict resolution-namely, religion,
psychology, education and training, psychotherapy, and sports.
The essays shed light on the process of peace and reconciliation
in challenging venues from South Africa and the Congo to
Rwanda, Iraq, and Kosovo.
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Foreword...........................................................i
 
About the Contributors...........................................iii
 
Visions in Conflict:Introduction..................................vii
Brian C. Alston
 
God, Strangers, Friends, Neighbors, Enemies: Religious Constructs of the "Other"..........................................1
William R. Clough
 
The Tribal Instinct Hypothesis: Evolution and the Social Psychology of Intergroup Relations...............................13
Mark Van Vugt and Justin H. Park
 
The Utility of Teaching Conflict Resolution in War: A Case Study
From Iraq.............................................................35
Elisa Levy
 
Through Tribulation and Despair: Understanding the Serbian Orthodox Church in Today’s Newly Independent Kosovo......45
Rudy Scholaert
 
The Role of Agnomancy in the Creation and Perpetuation of
Conflict...............................................................81
William R. Clough
 
Healing Hurts: The Forgiveness Factor (South Africa)..........101
Basil Joseph Pillay
 
Reconciliation After Genocide, Mass Killing or Intractable Conflict: Understanding the Roots of Violence, Psychological Recovery and Steps Toward a General Theory (Rwanda) .....111
Ervin Staub
 
Reconciliation and Peace Through Recreation, Play and Leisure: Approaches That Penetrate Deeply and Widely Throughout Society (East Africa)................................................141
Valarie Vat Kamatsiko
 
Reconciliation and Peace Through Recreation, Play, and Leisure (Uganda).............................................................157
Catherine O’Keefe
 
Advancing Healing and Reconciliation (Congo).................161
Ervin Staub and Laurie Anne Pearlman
 
Promoting Deeper Values: Lessons Learned and Some Common Themes..............................................................187
Steven E. Handwerker
 
 
About the Contributors:
 
Brian C. Alston, STM, MA, is an adjunct professor at Grand
Canyon University and has been involved in peaceful conflict resolution since leading peer mediation during Boston’s
turbulent school busing crisis of the 1970s. He is a master’s-
level clinician and college professor teaching in the areas of ethics, neurotheology, psychology, philosophy, and religion.
He has pioneered work in the disciplines of neurotheology
and relationship literacy. Currently he is bringing awareness
to the politicization of poverty, both domestic and international, by working in Haiti and by organizing symposia
and book projects (including the Visions in Conflict series) to disseminate the good work of others doing peaceful conflict resolution around the world.
 
William R. Clough, MDiv, DMin, is a professor in and program chair of the Pastoral Community Counseling Program at
Argosy University in Sarasota, Florida. His degrees include
an MDiv (theology) and DMin (counseling) from Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky,
and an MA (human development) from Salve Regina University
in Newport, Rhode Island. He writes and presents on practical theology, peacemaking, and counseling. He is an Educator Member of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors;
a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research;
a Diplomat of the National Center for Crisis Management; a Minister of Word and Sacrament in the Presbyterian Church,
USA; and a member of Peace River Presbytery.
 
Steven E. Handwerker, PhD, DDiv, is a licensed psychologist
in New York, Florida, and South Dakota and has served as a clinical psychologist with individuals, couples, and groups for more than three decades. He currently lives in Florida, where
he is a devoted husband of 35 years and a caring father to a
20-year-old daughter and a 16-year-old son. He is board
certified as a forensic examiner and trauma specialist. He
also serves on the Professional and Scientific Board for the
Crisis Management Division of the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security. Dr. Handwerker is chief executive
officer of the 501(c)(3) international peace organization
the International Association for the Advancement of Human Welfare, which he founded in 1997. He has also served as a
U.S. Supreme Court mediator. His work is diverse, as he continues to work with all individuals and groups who work toward peace.
 
Valarie Vat Kamatsiko is the regional research and
documentation coordinator for AmaNet, World Vision’s
peace network covering nine countries in East Africa. She
has carried out extensive context analysis to inform conflict-sensitive programming as well as research and advocacy in
the areas of conflict and peace building. Her most recent research projects and publications have been in the areas
of children and young people as peace builders, children affected by armed conflict, church approaches to peace
and reconciliation, and local capacities for peace assessments. She is also the editor of *The Peace-Seeker*, a quarterly
journal that facilitates the sharing of best practices in peace building and lessons learned within World Vision East Africa
and World Vision International.
 
Elisa Levy, MA, has written and trained others on team
building, conflict resolution, anger management, and
women’s rights. Her work ranges from training Sunnis and
Shiites on conflict resolution in Iraq to doing team building training for United Nations staff in southeastern Europe
and Fortune 500 companies in the United States. She has developed training programs on violence prevention for
the United Nations that have been replicated in 13
countries, and a book on violence prevention that she
co-authored is now used by more than 200 organizations
and universities around the world. Her audiences include
major airlines, restaurants, doctors, court administrators, teachers, and youth.
 
Catherine O’Keefe, MEd, CTRS, has been on the faculty of
the University of South Alabama in Mobile for almost 30
years. She earned her bachelor’s degree in art at Spring
Hill College, a Jesuit institution in Mobile, and her MEd in therapeutic recreation at the University of South Alabama.
She has spent her adult life teaching about the value of recreation in community building as a vehicle for the
inclusion of persons with disabilities and personal/group
health and wellness. One of her chief goals is to inform
social science disciplines of the benefits inherent in
recreation for societal good on both the local and global
levels.
 
Basil Joseph Pillay, PhD, is head of the Department of Behavioral Medicine at the Nelson R. Mandela School of
Medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and chief
clinical psychologist for hospital services of the KwaZulu-
Natal Provincial Administration in Durban, South Africa.
Widely published, he is an internationally recognized
academic and clinician, represents his discipline on
national and international bodies, and serves on several
scientific committees. He is a past president of the
Psychological Society of South Africa.
 
Rudy Scholaert, MA, served as World Vision International’s
peace building program director in Kosovo from 1999 to
2004. In this capacity, he acted as an advisor and program manager for a number of civil society development and
peace building projects across the province. It was at this
time that he became the driving force behind the Council
for the Peace & Tolerance program in the ethnically
divided city of Mitrovica. Rudy also led a number of
conflict mitigation projects in Kosovo funded by the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Swiss Department of Foreign
Affairs. Rudy is also the founder and president of the
Eagle Down Foundation (www.eagledown.org).
 
Ervin Staub, PhD, is a professor of psychology at the
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and founding
director of the PhD concentration in the psychology of
peace and the prevention of violence. President
emeritus of the Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict,
and Violence: Peace Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association and of the International Society
for Political Psychology, he has taught at Harvard and
was a visiting professor at Stanford University, the
University of Hawaii, and the London School of Economic
and Political Science. He has studied, written, and
lectured on the influences that lead to caring, helpful,
altruistic behavior and their development in children;
the origins of mass violence, especially genocide, mass
killing, torture, and terrorism; the prevention of group
violence; reconciliation in postconflict settings; the development of positive group relations; and the role
of passive and active bystanders in all these areas. Since
1998, Dr. Staub has worked on various projects in Rwanda, working with communities, national leaders, and journalists
as well as on radio dramas and with other educational
programs in Rwanda, Burundi, and the Congo to promote
healing, reconciliation, and violence prevention.
 
Mark Van Vugt, PhD, is a professor of social psychology at
the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. He obtained
his undergraduate degree from the University of Groningen
and his PhD from the University of Maastricht in The Netherlands. He has published widely on topics in social
and evolutionary psychology, including intergroup relations, leadership, social identity, altruism, and cooperation. He
is the chief editor of “Cooperation in Modern Society:
Promoting the Welfare of Communities, States, and Organizations” (Routledge, 2000) and co-author of the
textbook “Applying Social Psychology” (Sage, 2007). He
is a Fellow of the British Academy Centenary Project
"Lucy to Language" and a member of the editorial boards
of various journals in the field of social psychology.